Pronunciation

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Pronunciation

Message  gerardM le Dim 27 Mar - 14:50

Hi everyone,

I know we spoke about pronunciation several times but in another way and I think it better to start a new thread.

There's a song I like which is: "Let's Call the Whole Thing Off".

This song was sung by lots of people and I think my favorite is the one by Billie Holiday.

Did you know that the song was created by George and Ira Gerschwin (for the 1937 film "Shall we dance?" with Fred and Ginger)?

- Page on Wikipedia

- Ella Fitzgerald-Let's Call The Whole Thing Off on Youtube
- Fred Astaire-Lets Call The Whole Thing Off on Youtube
- Fred and Ginger - Let's Call the Whole Thing Off video on Youtube
- Fred and Ginger - Shall We Dance video on Youtube


Here're the words of the song by Ella -> http://lyrics.filestube.com/song/ebe78e6f3c4ebd1403ea,Lets-Call-the-Whole-Thing-Off.html

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Re: Pronunciation

Message  gerardM le Ven 22 Avr - 22:45

Hi everyone,

Here's a 14 page PDF document, written in French, about "Langue anglaise : Prononciation et rythme des phrases".

As far as I understand, it comes from a Belgian Univ.
Thanks to them!

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Re: Pronunciation

Message  gerardM le Ven 22 Avr - 23:12

Hi again, Wink

A series of other documents...



Dernière édition par gerardM le Sam 23 Avr - 10:10, édité 1 fois (Raison : typos)

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Re: Pronunciation

Message  gerardM le Ven 22 Avr - 23:58

Bonsoir à tous,

Je ne résiste pas pour reproduire cette page Web sur la prononciation... beaucoup de détails très intéressants !
American English Pronunciation - Word and sentence stress

Word stress
Word stress - the accent on one syllable in a word.
Word stress - general rules
• There is only one stress in one word.
• Only vowels are stressed, not consonants.

Word stress - specific rules (there are many exceptions to these rules)

The parts of the words in bold print are stressed.

Stress on the first syllable
• most 2-syllable nouns – china, table, export, pencil
• most 2-syllable adjectives – slender, clever, happy
Stress on the last syllable
• most 2-syllable verbs – to export, to decide, to begin
Stress on the second syllable from the end (penultimate syllable)
• words ending in “ic” – graphic, geographic, geologic, photographic
• words ending in “sion” and “tion” – television, revelation, information
Stress on the third syllable from the end (ante-penultimate syllable)
• words ending in “cy”, “ty”, “phy” and “gy” – democracy, dependability, photography, geology, society
• words ending in “al” – critical, geological
Compound words (words with two parts)
• compound nouns, the stress is on the first part – blackbird, greenhouse, bluebird, blackboard, notebook, bookstore, toothbrush, keyboard
• compound adjectives, the stress is on the second part – bad-tempered, old-fashioned
• compound verbs, the stress is on the second part – to understand, to overflow
• nouns + compound nouns (two word compound nouns), the stress is on the first word - air conditioner, computer programmer, nail polish, french fry

Sentence stress
Sentence stress - where word stress is the accent on one syllable in a word, sentence stress is accent on certain words within a sentence. Often considered to be the "rhythm" of English.
...
( http://funeasyenglish.com/american-english-pronunciation-word-and-sentence-stress.htm )


Dernière édition par gerardM le Sam 23 Avr - 10:04, édité 1 fois

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Re: Pronunciation

Message  gerardM le Sam 23 Avr - 0:03

RE,
American English Stress

Stress

Stress is one of the three aspects of rhythm in English pronunciation. Stress, linking, and intonation work together to create the rhythm of a fluent speaker. Being able to pronounce sounds correctly is a building block of rhythm, but students should not wait until sounds are mastered before learning about and practicing stress, linking, and intonation.

Stress is divided into two categories (syllable and sentence), each explained below. Syllable stress lessons or drills (at left) can be practiced in any order; the goal is to eventually become familiar with all the patterns. Sentence stress lessons (at left) should be practiced in order because lessons build on previous lessons.

Syllable Stress

...

Sentence Stress

...
( http://www.pronuncian.com/Stress/ )

Désolé, par respect pour l'auteur, puisque je n'ai pas demandé l'autorisation, je ne peux pas reproduire l'intégralité de sa page, que vous trouverez en suivant le lien ci-dessus.


Dernière édition par gerardM le Sam 23 Avr - 10:06, édité 1 fois

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Re: Pronunciation

Message  MurielB le Sam 23 Avr - 0:31

Hi Gérard, hi everybody
Tongue-twisters or poetry can teach you English pronunciation
" Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.
A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked.
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,
Where's the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?"
You easily pick up the right rhythm.

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Re: Pronunciation

Message  gerardM le Sam 23 Avr - 10:07

Hi Muriel,

...

You mandatorilly pick up the right rhythm. Wink

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Re: Pronunciation

Message  gerardM le Ven 13 Mai - 16:19

Hi everyone,

Why do many verbs ending with a single vowel+single consonant double this consonant for the past (aka preterit) and/or the past participle and/or present participle?

eg to begin -> beginning (past & past participle are irregular, that's why they don't double the consonant).
eg to scan -> I scanned, scanned, scanning
eg to chap -> etc.
eg to char -> etc.
eg to cavil -> I cavilled, cavilled, cavilling (no double l in American though)

Counter-example to caw -> cawing

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A poem to help you speak English better than 90% of the native English speakers in the world..

Message  MurielB le Mer 21 Jan - 13:58

I Gérard, everyone ! What about that poem ! Wink
http://www.thepoke.co.uk/2011/12/23/english-pronunciation/

Dearest creature in creation,
Study English pronunciation.
I will teach you in my verse
Sounds like corpse, corps, horse, and worse.
I will keep you, Suzy, busy,
Make your head with heat grow dizzy.
Tear in eye, your dress will tear.
So shall I! Oh hear my prayer.
Just compare heart, beard, and heard,
Dies and diet, lord and word,
Sword and sward, retain and Britain.
(Mind the latter, how it’s written.)
Now I surely will not plague you
With such words as plaque and ague.
But be careful how you speak:
Say break and steak, but bleak and streak;
Cloven, oven, how and low,
Script, receipt, show, poem, and toe.
Hear me say, devoid of trickery,
Daughter, laughter, and Terpsichore,
Typhoid, measles, topsails, aisles,
Exiles, similes, and reviles;
Scholar, vicar, and cigar,
Solar, mica, war and far;
One, anemone, Balmoral,
Kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel;
Gertrude, German, wind and mind,
Scene, Melpomene, mankind.
Billet does not rhyme with ballet,
Bouquet, wallet, mallet, chalet.
Blood and flood are not like food,
Nor is mould like should and would.
Viscous, viscount, load and broad,
Toward, to forward, to reward.
And your pronunciation’s OK
When you correctly say croquet,
Rounded, wounded, grieve and sieve,
Friend and fiend, alive and live.
Ivy, privy, famous; clamour
And enamour rhyme with hammer.
River, rival, tomb, bomb, comb,
Doll and roll and some and home.
Stranger does not rhyme with anger,
Neither does devour with clangour.
Souls but foul, haunt but aunt,
Font, front, wont, want, grand, and grant,
Shoes, goes, does. Now first say finger,
And then singer, ginger, linger,
Real, zeal, mauve, gauze, gouge and gauge,
Marriage, foliage, mirage, and age.
Query does not rhyme with very,
Nor does fury sound like bury.
Dost, lost, post and doth, cloth, loth.
Job, nob, bosom, transom, oath.
Though the differences seem little,
We say actual but victual.
Refer does not rhyme with deafer.
Fe0ffer does, and zephyr, heifer.
Mint, pint, senate and sedate;
Dull, bull, and George ate late.
Scenic, Arabic, Pacific,
Science, conscience, scientific.
Liberty, library, heave and heaven,
Rachel, ache, moustache, eleven.
We say hallowed, but allowed,
People, leopard, towed, but vowed.
Mark the differences, moreover,
Between mover, cover, clover;
Leeches, breeches, wise, precise,
Chalice, but police and lice;
Camel, constable, unstable,
Principle, disciple, label.
Petal, panel, and canal,
Wait, surprise, plait, promise, pal.
Worm and storm, chaise, chaos, chair,
Senator, spectator, mayor.
Tour, but our and succour, four.
Gas, alas, and Arkansas.
Sea, idea, Korea, area,
Psalm, Maria, but malaria.
Youth, south, southern, cleanse and clean.
Doctrine, turpentine, marine.
Compare alien with Italian,
Dandelion and battalion.
Sally with ally, yea, ye,
Eye, I, ay, aye, whey, and key.
Say aver, but ever, fever,
Neither, leisure, skein, deceiver.
Heron, granary, canary.
Crevice and device and aerie.
Face, but preface, not efface.
Phlegm, phlegmatic, ass, glass, bass.
Large, but target, gin, give, verging,
Ought, out, joust and scour, scourging.
Ear, but earn and wear and tear
Do not rhyme with here but ere.
Seven is right, but so is even,
Hyphen, roughen, nephew Stephen,
Monkey, donkey, Turk and jerk,
Ask, grasp, wasp, and cork and work.
Pronunciation (think of Psyche!)
Is a paling stout and spikey?
Won’t it make you lose your wits,
Writing groats and saying grits?
It’s a dark abyss or tunnel:
Strewn with stones, stowed, solace, gunwale,
Islington and Isle of Wight,
Housewife, verdict and indict.
Finally, which rhymes with enough,
Though, through, plough, or dough, or cough?
Hiccough has the sound of cup.
My advice is to give up!!!


Dernière édition par MurielB le Mer 21 Jan - 14:17, édité 2 fois

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Re: Pronunciation

Message  MurielB le Mer 21 Jan - 14:06


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Re: Pronunciation

Message  gerardM le Mer 21 Jan - 14:41

Hi Muriel,

I didn't work on the poem for now but I hope I will be able soon.

I'm surprised and even shocked by the title "A poem to help you speak English better than 90% of the native English speakers in the world".
English (or say American) is a language which belongs to its speakers and not to an organization. So, I think it's impossible to speak better than 90%...

"People rule" was the motto Norma (the American who taught me her native language) keeps repeating.

First, a foreigner must not read the poem by themselve, without oodles of explanations (and good pronunciation).

~~ edit

Okay I hadn't realized the video was linked to the poem and that at least, here's someone reading and showing a good English pronunciation.
But again, "better than 90%..." scratch scratch

~~

A good pronunciation should be the basis of, the first step to learning.

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Re: Pronunciation

Message  MurielB le Mer 21 Jan - 22:07

Hi Gérard
You are right it is exagerated ! when people read ""better than 90%..."they are eager to read or listen to the poem what is exactly what the author wants. Wink

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